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Risk Management Strategies for Coastal Communities

base map 1. Acquisition and relocation 2. Building retrofit 3. Enhanced flood warning and evacuation planning 4. Land use management / zoning and flood insurance 5. Deployable floodwalls 6. Floodwalls 7. Levees 8. Seawalls 9. Revetments 10. Bulkheads 11. Storm surge barriers 12. Beach restoration 13. Beach restoration and breakwaters 14. Beach restoration and groins 15. Drainage improvements 16. Living shorelines 17. Overwash fans 18. Reefs 19. Submerged aquatic vegetation 20. Wetlands 1. Acquisition and Relocation 2. Building Retrofit 3. Enhanced Flood Warning and Evacuation Planning 4. Land Use Management / Zoning and Flood Insurance 5. Deployable Floodwalls 6. Floodwalls 7. Levees 8. Seawalls 9. Revetments 10. Bulkheads 11. Storm Surge Barriers 12. Beach Restoration 13. Beach Restoration and Breakwaters 14. Beach Restoration and Groins 15. Drainage Improvements 16. Living Shorelines 17. Overwash Fans 18. Reefs 19. Submerged Aquatic Vegetation 20. Wetlands

This map shows various coastal storm damage risk management strategies communities can use to adapt to anticipated base flood level change by 2100 (at a non-specific location). Although specific communities should consider a range of all possible solutions based on site-specific conditions, not all strategies to reduce coastal storm damage risk are structural solutions.

Move the slider bar along the bottom to see the various water levels.

Moving the slider bar in the Relative Sea Change graph will move the corresponding levels of flood risks in the accompanying graphic.

Contact Us

E-mail: dll-cenado-pa@usace.army.mil

Phone: 347-370-4550

Risk Mgmt. Measures

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The above map, titled Risk Management Strategies for Coastal Communities, shows various coastal storm damage risk management strategies communities can use to adapt to anticipated base flood level change by 2100. Not all strategies to reduce coastal storm damage risk are structural solutions.

Communities should consider adopting a combination of strategies -- including Structural, Non-structural, and Natural or Nature-Based solutions -- that emphasize wise use of the floodplain and programmatic measures to manage risk. Below is a range of strategies available to reduce future coastal storm damage risk to coastal communities.

Although specific communities should consider a range of all possible solutions based on site-specific conditions, not all strategies to reduce coastal storm damage risk are structural solutions.

About the North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study

Map depicting areas covered by the Comprehensive Study

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recently completed a report detailing the results of a two-year study to address coastal storm and flood risk to vulnerable populations, property, ecosystems, and infrastructure in areas of the North Atlantic region of the United States affected by Hurricane Sandy.

The study, known as the North Atlantic Coast Comprehensive Study, is designed to help local communities better understand changing flood risks associated with climate change and to provide tools to help those communities better prepare for future flood risks. It builds on lessons learned from Hurricane Sandy and attempts to bring to bear the latest scientific information available for state, local, and tribal planners.

The conclusions of the study, as detailed in the final report, include several findings, outcomes, and opportunities, such as the use of a nine-step Coastal Storm Risk Management Framework that can be customized for any coastal watershed. 

Map of study area 

Geospatial and Modeling Products

NACCS geodatabase: This database contains vector GIS information from various NACCS geospatial analyses. It also has features used to generate report maps and figures, including base map features. Refer to ArcGIS metadata for more information about each feature. Click here to request NACCS geodatabase products* (Esri file geodatabase format).

 

sample of geospatial products

Raster geospatial products: These are raster files presenting results of the NACCS exposure analysis, risk analysis, future mean sea level inundation mapping, and housing density projections. These products were generated using the best available data at the time and may or may not accurately reflect existing or future conditions. Refer to ArcGIS metadata for more information about each file. Click here to request raster geospatial products* (TIFF format).

 

Numerical modeling wiki: The back bays of barrier islands to the bay side of beaches and dunes as well as other areas of the North Atlantic Coast including embayments and harbors are at risk of storm surge and tidal flooding via barrier island inlets. Long Beach Island, New Jersey was identified for the NACCS Barrier Island and Back Bay Example to present an illustrative example of how a beach and dune system would perform based on sea level change inundation scenarios as well as the impacts of coastal flooding from back bay areas.  This example is not intended to evaluate the actual coastal storm risk and consequences. Click here to go to the numerical modeling wiki site.

 

Sea Level Affecting Marshes Model update algorithm: This algorithm has only been implemented as a stand-alone FORTRAN code; implementation into SLAMM is done by the developers to maintain consistent code management.

Primary Productivity
For the purposes of this algorithm, primary productivity refers only to wetland vegetation; it includes both above- and below-ground production. Both mechanisms are lumped into a general organic production term, which then is used to modify bed elevation.The algorithm includes both primary productivity and marsh collapse. This algorithm is available upon email request* (standalone FORTRAN code).

Source Material
This algorithm is based on the relative elevation sub-model presented in the following source:
Couvillion, Brady R., Gregory D. Steyer, Hongqing Wang, Holly J. Beck, and John M. Rybczyk (2013). “Forecasting the Effects of Coastal Protection & Restoration Projects on Wetland Morphology in Coastal Louisiana under Multiple Environmental Uncertainty Scenarios” Journal of Coastal Research: Special Issue 67 - Louisiana′s 2012 Coastal Master Plan Technical Analysis: 29-50. 2013.

NACCS webinars and presentations

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  • Presentation
  • Audio recording of webinar (available upon request)