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Posted 9/6/2016

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By Ann Marie R. Harvie
USACE, New England District


In a ceremony on Aug. 11 the career of New England District’s most senior and distinguished employee was celebrated as over 145 people, some who flew in from as far away as Arizona, traveled to the Café Escadrille Restaurant in Burlington, Massachusetts to honor William C. Scully, Deputy District Engineer, Programs and Project Management.

Bobby Byrne, Distinguished Civilian Gallery member, retired Chief of Programs and the other half of the “dynamic duo” served as Master of Ceremonies.  “The Lone Ranger had Tonto, Batman had Robin, and poor Bill had me,” he joked.

Byrne introduced Scully’s family as well as dignitaries from Headquarters in Washington, North Atlantic Division, and many former Commanders and the many retirees that were in attendance.  Bryne talked about the very beginning of Scully’s federal career, which began on his college campus when a recruiter asked him to join the U.S. Air Force.  After his honorable and faithful service, Scully joined the Corps in New England in 1968, hired by another New England District legend – Dick Reardon.

Byrne had the audience laughing when he spoke about Bill's impeccable handwriting and about the small offices they shared with smokers and how some modern inventions such as the "computer" were not to Scully’s liking. 

Scully became the Deputy Division Engineer for Project Management in 1990 and remained in that position until his retirement.   The projects Scully was responsible for are too numerous to list, but some of the higher profile projects were:  finding a new headquarters for the New England District; work for the Border Patrol, Hanscom Air Force Base and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Byrne said that Scully has been a member of the Society of American Military Engineers since the very beginning and that he was an active member of the NED Golf League and the now defunct NED Bowling League.

Col. Christopher Barron, New England District Commander, began the long list of the day’s speakers.  He said that he had a hard time finding what to say to a man who served 53 years.  Col. Barron asked the audience to go back in time to the 1960’s and reflect on the missions that were in place at that time.  “For the most part the missions haven’t changed, but some of them have evolved,” he said.

He said that the success of the missions are a result of the commitment of the New England District team and that Scully has devoted his entire career to assist in the mission’s success. 

Col. Barron said that Scully welcomed him with patience and understanding when he first came on board as commander.  “No question was too trivial to ask,” said Barron.  “He made my transition as fast and as gentle as possible.”

Col. Barron presented Scully with the Meritorious Civilian Performance Award, the second highest award a civilian can attain.  Approved by Lt. Gen. Todd Semonite, Scully received the award for his 48 years of service to the Corps of Engineers.

In addition, Col. Barron recited some history and then presented Scully with the Bronze De Fleury Medal, the first medal struck by Congress, for his 48 years of dedicated service to the Corps of Engineers.

Lloyd Caldwell, the Director of Military Programs and a senior SES at the Corps Headquarters, said he has known Scully for about 15 years and when they first began attending the Regional Management Board, it was apparent to him the esteem the others in the North Atlantic Division had for him.  “It was not an easy transition to work together at NAD,” he said.  “Bill was in the forefront of it.  He is leaving a tremendous mark here.  The District and Division are better because of him.  He is the ultimate professional.”

Mr. Caldwell presented Scully with a print of the iconic representation of the castle which was originally created in the 1800’s.

Cathy Shuman from Corps Headquarters said that she didn’t have the good fortune to work with Scully as long as others, but he often helped her put out fires.  “Bill always had the answer,” she said.

Shuman read letters from Ms. Jo-Ellen Darcy, ASA for Civil Works and Maj. Gen. Donald Jackson, both congratulating Scully on his retirement.  When she finished reading them, she presented them to Scully.

All of the former commanders in attendance got up and said a few words of thanks and appreciation to Scully.  They included Col. Carl Sciple, Col. Philip Harris, Col. Cliff Richardson, Col. Mike Meuleners, Col. Thomas Feir, and Col. Charles Samaris.

Rose Schmidt, Engineering/Planning, said that Scully stood up the District’s Regional Center of Expertise for Groundwater Modeling in 2009.  She presented him with a rock from Joint Base Cape Cod that had special significance.  “It’s nice having leadership behind you,” she said.  “You’ve been behind us the whole time.  You’ve been our rock.”

Brian Murphy, Information Management, said that he worked with Scully for 17 years.  The audience laughed at Murphy’s impersonation of Scully’s soft spoken voice that often wreaked havoc with his audio equipment.  “I’m going to miss those moments,” he said. 

Murphy presented Scully with a pictorial history of all the Chief of Engineers who were from New England from himself, Angie Vanaria, Steve Andon and Julie Mackley.

Gary Morin told stories about playing golf with Scully and his grandsons.  Reminding Scully about modern technology, Morin presented Scully with a ball marker and a putter.  “Hopefully you’ll get to spend more time playing golf,” said Morin.

Scully's grandson Dan was the last of the speakers.  Everyone in the audience knew Scully as a consummate, meticulous professional, but he and his brothers know him as Grandpa.  “He plays golf with his grandsons on Sunday, offering advice when we need it,” he said.  “He carves up the turkey on Thanksgiving and plays Santa on Christmas Eve, artfully arranging the presents under the tree as only an engineer would while the rest of the house sleeps.  He’s been the greatest role model, grandfather and pal that a boy could ever ask for.”

Dan concluded by saying that Scully had always been his hero and hopes that Scully’s retirement means that they can spend more time together.

Col. Barron had many gifts to present Scully.  The first was a flag flown over the U.S. Capitol by Sen. Jack Reed’s request.  The flag came with a certificate of authenticity. 

Next he received two large cards from attendees with many messages of well wishes contained inside them.  He also received a framed picture of the two New England District headquarters – the former Waltham site and the current Concord Park office. 

The final gift was the Concord Minuteman statue, which Scully said meant a lot to him. Col. Barron ended the list of speakers and read a letter from Maj. Gen. Stanley Genega and presented it to Scully.

When it was his turn to speak, Scully said that he was overwhelmed.  He thanked Angie Vanaria, Sally Rigione, Judy Antonellis and Julie Mackley for organizing the lunch and Byrne for serving as Master of Ceremonies.  He said that he was glad that his family could experience the uniqueness and the bond of the Corps family.  “We give so much of our lives to the Corps family,” he said.  “It is a great love that we have for the Corps and each other.”

Scully said that he’s seen and done a lot during his career.  “Technology and leadership styles have changed over the years, but the people haven’t,” he said.

The soon-to-be retiree said that he had mixed emotions about retiring.  “It will be nice not to think about the business,” he said.  “It will be nice to play golf with my grandsons because we are the perfect foursome.  Thank you from the bottom of my heart.”

In a ceremony on Aug. 11 the career of New England District’s most senior and distinguished employee was celebrated as over 145 people, some who flew in from as far away as Arizona, traveled to the Café Escadrille Restaurant in Burlington, Massachusetts to honor William C. Scully, Deputy District Engineer, Programs and Project Management.

Bobby Byrne, Distinguished Civilian Gallery member, retired Chief of Programs and the other half of the “dynamic duo” served as Master of Ceremonies.  “The Lone Ranger had Tonto, Batman had Robin, and poor Bill had me,” he joked.

Byrne introduced Scully’s family as well as dignitaries from Headquarters in Washington, North Atlantic Division, and many former Commanders and the many retirees that were in attendance.  Bryne talked about the very beginning of Scully’s federal career, which began on his college campus when a recruiter asked him to join the U.S. Air Force.  After his honorable and faithful service, Scully joined the Corps in New England in 1968, hired by another New England District legend – Dick Reardon.

Byrne had the audience laughing when he spoke about Bill's impeccable handwriting and about the small offices they shared with smokers and how some modern inventions such as the "computer" were not to Scully’s liking. 

Scully became the Deputy Division Engineer for Project Management in 1990 and remained in that position until his retirement.   The projects Scully was responsible for are too numerous to list, but some of the higher profile projects were:  finding a new headquarters for the New England District; work for the Border Patrol, Hanscom Air Force Base and the Environmental Protection Agency.

Byrne said that Scully has been a member of the Society of American Military Engineers since the very beginning and that he was an active member of the NED Golf League and the now defunct NED Bowling League.

Col. Christopher Barron, New England District Commander, began the long list of the day’s speakers.  He said that he had a hard time finding what to say to a man who served 53 years.  Col. Barron asked the audience to go back in time to the 1960’s and reflect on the missions that were in place at that time.  “For the most part the missions haven’t changed, but some of them have evolved,” he said. 

He said that the success of the missions are a result of the commitment of the New England District team and that Scully has devoted his entire career to assist in the mission’s success. 

Col. Barron said that Scully welcomed him with patience and understanding when he first came on board as commander.  “No question was too trivial to ask,” said Barron.  “He made my transition as fast and as gentle as possible.”

Col. Barron presented Scully with the Meritorious Civilian Performance Award, the second highest award a civilian can attain.  Approved by Lt. Gen. Todd Semonite, Scully received the award for his 48 years of service to the Corps of Engineers.

In addition, Col. Barron recited some history and then presented Scully with the Bronze De Fleury Medal, the first medal struck by Congress, for his 48 years of dedicated service to the Corps of Engineers.

Lloyd Caldwell, the Director of Military Programs and a senior SES at the Corps Headquarters, said he has known Scully for about 15 years and when they first began attending the Regional Management Board, it was apparent to him the esteem the others in the North Atlantic Division had for him.  “It was not an easy transition to work together at NAD,” he said.  “Bill was in the forefront of it.  He is leaving a tremendous mark here.  The District and Division are better because of him.  He is the ultimate professional.”

Mr. Caldwell presented Scully with a print of the iconic representation of the castle which was originally created in the 1800’s

Cathy Shuman from Corps Headquarters said that she didn’t have the good fortune to work with Scully as long as others, but he often helped her put out fires.  “Bill always had the answer,” she said.

Shuman read letters from Ms. Jo-Ellen Darcy, ASA for Civil Works and Maj. Gen. Donald Jackson, both congratulating Scully on his retirement.  When she finished reading them, she presented them to Scully.

All of the former commanders in attendance got up and said a few words of thanks and appreciation to Scully.  They included Col. Carl Sciple, Col. Philip Harris, Col. Cliff Richardson, Col. Mike Meuleners, Col. Thomas Feir, and Col. Charles Samaris.

Rose Schmidt, Engineering/Planning, said that Scully stood up the District’s Regional Center of Expertise for Groundwater Modeling in 2009.  She presented him with a rock from Joint Base Cape Cod that had special significance.  “It’s nice having leadership behind you,” she said.  “You’ve been behind us the whole time.  You’ve been our rock.”

Brian Murphy, Information Management, said that he worked with Scully for 17 years.  The audience laughed at Murphy’s impersonation of Scully’s soft spoken voice that often wreaked havoc with his audio equipment.  “I’m going to miss those moments,” he said. 

Murphy presented Scully with a pictorial history of all the Chief of Engineers who were from New England from himself, Angie Vanaria, Steve Andon and Julie Mackley.

Gary Morin told stories about playing golf with Scully and his grandsons.  Reminding Scully about modern technology, Morin presented Scully with a ball marker and a putter.  “Hopefully you’ll get to spend more time playing golf,” said Morin.

Scully's grandson Dan was the last of the speakers.  Everyone in the audience knew Scully as a consummate, meticulous professional, but he and his brothers know him as Grandpa.  “He plays golf with his grandsons on Sunday, offering advice when we need it,” he said.  “He carves up the turkey on Thanksgiving and plays Santa on Christmas Eve, artfully arranging the presents under the tree as only an engineer would while the rest of the house sleeps.  He’s been the greatest role model, grandfather and pal that a boy could ever ask for.”

Dan concluded by saying that Scully had always been his hero and hopes that Scully’s retirement means that they can spend more time together.

Col. Barron had many gifts to present Scully.  The first was a flag flown over the U.S. Capitol by Sen. Jack Reed’s request.  The flag came with a certificate of authenticity. 

Next he received two large cards from attendees with many messages of well wishes contained inside them.  He also received a framed picture of the two New England District headquarters – the former Waltham site and the current Concord Park office. 

The final gift was the Concord Minuteman statue, which Scully said meant a lot to him. Col. Barron ended the list of speakers and read a letter from Maj. Gen. Stanley Genega and presented it to Scully.

When it was his turn to speak, Scully said that he was overwhelmed.  He thanked Angie Vanaria, Sally Rigione, Judy Antonellis and Julie Mackley for organizing the lunch and Byrne for serving as Master of Ceremonies.  He said that he was glad that his family could experience the uniqueness and the bond of the Corps family.  “We give so much of our lives to the Corps family,” he said.  “It is a great love that we have for the Corps and each other.”

Scully said that he’s seen and done a lot during his career.  “Technology and leadership styles have changed over the years, but the people haven’t,” he said.

The soon-to-be retiree said that he had mixed emotions about retiring.  “It will be nice not to think about the business,” he said.  “It will be nice to play golf with my grandsons because we are the perfect foursome.  Thank you from the bottom of my heart.”